Tag Archives: daily echo

One Lovely Blog Award…Thank you!

One Lovely Blog AwardI would like to thank Charles Ray‘s fantastic book review blog and also everyone that takes the time to read my blog.  I am very honored to be nominated for this award that I will proudly display on my site.

Now I reveal 7 things about myself you may or may not have known.

1.  I wrote my first novel in High School.  Chapters were sold for $0.25 cents each…It kept my car in gas.

2.  My favorite book is “Peck’s Bad Boy and his Pa“.

3.  When my son and daughter were born, I was in the room watching.

4.  I have the honor of being married to the same woman for forty-five years.  If I had to do it again, I would in a heartbeat.

5.  My first published novel, “The Wolf’s Moon” was written in longhand and took about a year or so to finish.

6.  I love to watch nature, watching flowers grow in one of our many gardens.  Sitting in the room where I write I watch the animals drink from the creek.

7.  Most of all, I love working with my wife each day, meeting all of the wonderful people around the world and reading their thoughts in blogging.

Oh yeah, did I mention anything about woodworking?  No?  Well, maybe next time.

Blogs I’m nominating

These bloggers that I am nominating are just a few of the wonderful people out there in the blogosphere.  If I were to list everyone, the list would be 18 pages long and growing.  Thank you for providing a snapshot of life from your side of the street 🙂

Chris The Story Reading Ape – Chris Graham

Daily Echo – Sue Vincent

Inesemjphotography – Inese

Myths of the Mirror – Diana

Paul Militaru

Sally Cronin

Viv The Owl Lady @V@

Yadadarcyyada – Donna Parker

Nick Verron

Michael’s Origins

Just Olga

Legends of Windemere

Dan Alatorre – Author

Jo Robinson

Teagan’s Books

Rules for the Award

In conclusion, to all my blogger nominees, here is the list of rules to participate:

  1. Thank the person who nominated you and provide a link to her/his blog.
  2. List 7 interesting facts about yourself.
  3. Nominate 15 other bloggers and inform them by posting on their site.
  4. List the rules and display the award.

Changing Direction: Guest Post by Sue Vincent!!

scotland trip jan 15 732It is easy to get caught in a web of frustration and despair when life seems to wander off at a tangent and do its own thing without bothering to consult you. It isn’t always easy to see the positive side of change, not when you are stuck in the middle of it and trying to juggle the consequences and understand a whole new game plan…especially when the game, as well as the rules, seems to have changed.

There are those who revel in the adventure of new challenges, others prefer familiar terrain rather than a tangential path, but sometimes the unexpected happens and change occurs, whether you like it or not. When it comes, you have two basic options… fight it tooth and nail in an attempt to maintain as much of the status quo as you can, or embrace it and see where it takes you. There is a third choice, though it takes a different approach… you can seek change. Yet even those who, through optimism or lunacy, enjoy the challenges brought by such an adventure are not going to be comfortable when change start to loom unbidden on the horizon. There is always that moment of lost familiarity… a time when even the negatives of the current situation seem preferable to the unknowns of the new.

You just cannot see beyond the skyline and have little or no idea how things will work out. It doesn’t matter if it is a big change or a small one, it will have to be dealt with somehow. Sometimes, though, you can see the necessity for change and have a glimpse of benefits that may offset the inevitable upset. Even writers, fond of their characters, might begin to see there is a need to move on…

For the past couple of years I have been involved in a writing partnership with Stuart France. The books we have written together have told the story of our adventures in the ancient landscape of England. We took real conversations and events and wove them into a journey for fictitious characters, echoing our own but not following it slavishly. And we had fun with the books, both the living of them and the writing.

There came a point, though, with the sixth such book, where we knew something would have to shift in the way we wrote them or people, both readers and writers, would end up bored with the familiar pattern. Change, it seemed, was going to become inevitable, so instead of waiting for it to bite our ankles, we walked out to meet it head on, by the simple expedient of having the founder of our School arrested.

Yes, I know that sounds a bit drastic… but it turned out to be a rather elegant solution, if I say so myself.

I suppose I ought to explain…

Stuart and I are two members of the team who run The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School, with Steve Tanham, the founder of the School, making up the triad. In the books Don and Wen loosely correspond to an amalgam of Stuart and I, while Steve is the inspiration from which we drew Ben.

We decided to have Ben arrested for his part in a daring midnight raid instigated by Wen…

The original plotline was vague and minimal, taking us no further than the end of Scions of Albion. We had no plans to start a new book till next year and little idea how it would unfold. Steve, however, having read of ‘his’ character’s plight in the newly published Scions, cleverly responded with a blog post which became a series and a story in its own right. In order to tie the inconsistencies between the two stories together, Stuart and I began to plot… in a purely writerly sense, of course.

We had, by our own choice, set the proverbial ball of change in motion. But once that ball is moving anything can happen. We had not expected Ben’s Bit… and our response took us down a whole new avenue of unexpected adventure, where the real travels of the writers became the foundation of a lighthearted and wholly fictitious story.

It seems to work well; the plot itself somehow encapsulates the inner journey we teach in the School, Ben’s incarceration is a perfect metaphor for the incarnate soul and the story allows us to explore some of Don and Wen’s wilder theories about the ancient stones that dot the landscape of Britain … and their possible purpose.But n ben 3d

Plus, Ben now stays in prison…

… and But ‘n’ Ben is almost ready for release…

And all because of unexpected changes.

I would like to thank Patrick for having me over as his guest today!


prof picSue Vincent is a Yorkshire born writer, painter and award winning poet. She is also one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. Sue lives in Buckinghamshire, England, having been stranded there due to an unfortunate incident with a pin, a map and a blindfold; a temporary glitch of some twenty years duration. She has a lasting love-affair with the landscape of Albion; that hidden country of the heart that is the backdrop for many of her books, particularly those co-authored with Stuart France. She is currently owned by a small dog who also blogs and who gets all the fan mail.

Connect with Sue:-

Daily Echo Blog The Silent Eye Twitter @SCVincent LinkedIn Facebook Google+ Pinterest Tumblr Goodreads Amazon UK author page Amazon.com author page

Daily Echo – Sue Vincent: When reviews really matter…

Excellent information about book reviews from Author Sue Vincent!!

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

Image source reddit.com

 “Bilbo Baggins was a Hobbit who lived in his Hobbit hole and never went for adventures, at last Gandalf the wizard and his Dwarves persuaded him to go. He had a very exiting (sic) time fighting goblins and wargs. At last they get to the lonely mountain; Smaug, the dragon who guards it is killed and after a terrific battle with the goblins he returned home — rich! This book, with the help of maps, does not need any illustrations it is good and should appeal to all children between the ages of 5 and 9.” Rayner Unwin’s review of The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

In 1936 a ten year old boy was given a book by his father. This was not just any book, nor just any boy… Rayner Unwin was the son of Sir Stanley Unwin, founder of the publishing firm George Allen…

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