Tag Archives: Flickering Lamps

Flickering Lamps: Exploring the world’s first (and most famous) garden cemetery: Père Lachaise

Always interesting research from Flickering Lamps!

Flickering Lamps

This week Flickering Lamps is taking a break from the hidden, not so well known sites that often grace this site to explore probably the most famous cemetery in the world: Paris’ Père Lachaise.  Opened as the world’s first garden cemetery in 1804, Père Lachaise (or to give its original name, cimetière de l’Est – East Cemetery) was the inspiration for many other grand Victorian garden cemeteries, both in Europe and across the Atlantic in the Americas.  Situated on the edge of the city, Père Lachaise was opened to provide a dignified burial space for all of Paris’ citizens.  Around a million people have been laid to rest there since it opened in 1804, and today, around two million people visit the cemetery every year.

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Flickering Lamps: The ancient rock-cut tombs by the Lancashire coast

Regular readers of this blog will know that I’m especially interested in particularly old and unusual graves, and the subject of today’s post definitely falls into that category.  On th…

Source: The ancient rock-cut tombs by the Lancashire coast

Gnome, The Fairy Garden, The Linden Chronicles

An Anglo-Saxon cemetery in Greenwich Park

An Anglo-Saxon cemetery in Greenwich Park.

Stockholm, Ekerö, Adelsö, Uppland, Fornminnen-Gravar-Gravfält
Stockholm, Ekerö, Adelsö, Uppland, Fornminnen-Gravar-Gravfält

The little mortuary at St George in the East and its reincarnation as a museum

Excellent pictures and history from Flickering Lamps!

Flickering Lamps

St George’s Gardens, the park on the site of the former churchyard of St George in the East in Stepney, is a neat, peaceful place – when I visited, the play area was full of children, and other people were relaxing on benches or looking at the old monuments near the church.  In the midst of all of this is a derelict building that looks terribly sad and out of place.  However, this forlorn little building has a fascinating history that includes that most infamous of East End criminals, Jack the Ripper, and later became a pioneering centre for the education of local children.

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A taste for the dramatic: the grand monuments of Kensal Green

Great pictures and history of The Monuments of Kensal Green from Flickering Lamps Blog

A taste for the dramatic: the grand monuments of Kensal Green.

Kensal Green Monuments

Temple Church: the hidden church founded by the Knights Templar

A most interesting history and picture documentation of Temple Church: The Hidden Church Founded by the Knights Templar

Flickering Lamps

The term “hidden gem” gets bandied around a lot in relation to all sorts of places in London – bars and restaurants, museums, galleries and historic buildings.  It’s a bit of an overworn phrase, but the subject of today’s post definitely fits the criteria for a hidden gem: small and off the beaten track, pretty and perfectly formed.

Through a little gateway on Fleet Street lies the Temple, the inner sanctum of Britain’s legal profession.  It’s a curious name – one that always intrigued me when I was younger, going through Temple Station whilst on the District Line and wondering if there actually was a temple there.  There is no temple, but amid the chambers of barristers is a little old church that has a history going all the way back to the Knights Templar.

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