Free Books for Kindle for Tuesday — Digital Book Today

Enjoy these Free Books for Kindle (limited time offer). These are proven winners based upon user reviews. Listed below are selected free Books from our Top 100 Best Free Kindle Books list. Enjoy the best free books for Kindle to read with our new list of freebies for Tuesday. Clicking on a book cover or link will take you…

via Free Books for Kindle for Tuesday — Digital Book Today

CreateSpace Now Replaced by KDP Print | Savvy Book Writers

Last fall we published – for the first time print books in the German language via the printing arm of KDP. We were very lucky as the books were in German, and intended for readers in Europe. The language and the country for which the books were mostly intended for are supported by KDP. That’s not the case in some other countries: . Languages Authors and publishers can upload and sell books with content and metadata written in the languages listed here: . Distribution – Orders Amazon’s KDP Print doesn’t currently support several paperback distributions, for example to Amazon.com.au, Amazon.com.br, or Amazon.nl. Australian users can place orders from Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk. Portuguese language users can place orders from Amazon.com. Dutch language users can place orders from Amazon.de. . Other Requirements: Let your lay-outer, e-book formatter, and cover designer know about the Amazon specifics, such as trim sizes. They are varying slightly from those of CreateSpace for example. The most common trim size for paperbacks in the U.S. is 6″ x 9″ (15.24 x 22.86 cm), this will be displayed as the default option when you access the “Print Options” from the Paperback Content section of

Source: CreateSpace Now Replaced by KDP Print | Savvy Book Writers

Sally’s Cafe and Bookstore – New Book on the Shelves – #WWI drama – The Dandelion Clock by Rebecca Bryn.

Another great read from Sally!!

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delighted to welcome Rebecca Bryn to the Cafe and Bookstore with her new release, The Dandelion Clock, on pre-order for September 5th.

About the Dandelion Clock

Bill, a farm boy brought up in a village on the Duke of Buccleuch’s Northamptonshire estate, is plucking up his courage to ask his sweetheart, Florrie, to marry him. Florrie has given up her dream of being a dancer to bring up her siblings and protect them from their violent, sexually abusive widowed father. For her, marriage to Bill is love, escape, and protection: a dream to be clung to.

When war breaks out in August 1914, Bill and Florrie’s dreams are dashed – Bill is sent with the Royal Buckinghamshire Hussars, a yeomanry cavalry regiment, to fight in Gallipoli, Egypt, and Palestine taking with him a horse, Copper, volunteered for service by the 7th duke’s young daughter, Lady Alice. Bill makes promises before…

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5 Ways How You Can Beat Your Competition | Savvy Book Writers

Did you notice that all of the online book sites, be it Apple’s book sales pages, BarnesandNoble.com  (they show even several slots with books in the same genre), Amazon.com, or Kobo, wherev…

Source: 5 Ways How You Can Beat Your Competition | Savvy Book Writers

Create Believable “Troubled” Characters by Studying Personality Disorders – by Anne R. Allen…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Personality disorders can create a distorted self-image.

Most of the truly rotten villains in fiction are what used to be called “psychopaths.” (Now clinically known as people with ASPD: Anti-Social Personality Disorder.) These are people who have no conscience and no empathy.

But psychopaths can make boring fiction. Psychopathic villains have pretty uncomplicated motives. They’re usually sexually twisted sadists or conscience-free monsters who do evil things because they’re, well…evil.

And not all people with ASPD need to be villains. Benedict Cumberbatch’s version of Sherlock Holmes has the ASPD detachment from normal human emotions like guilt and empathy. Plenty of people with the disorder lead normal, non-criminal lives. Even a conscience-free person needs a reason to commit a crime.

But you can create more interesting antagonists if you give them more relatable personality disorders.

Continue reading HERE

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